A Look at the Women’s March in Los Angeles

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A dispatch from the Los Angeles march, which served as a balm for those heartbroken by Donald Trump’s inauguration.

By Morgan Baskin

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(Photo: Morgan Baskin)

Over 750,000 women, men, and children flooded into downtown Los Angeles Saturday, coating the streets surrounding City Hall and the Civic Center in hues of pink and white. It was just one of over 600 sister marches across the globe — including Ecuador, Singapore, Finland, France, and Kosovo — and the largest of all the women’s marches in the United States.

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(Photos: Morgan Baskin)

Teenagers climbed on top of city waste trucks, leading thousands of marchers in a chant: “What does a democracy look like?” The responding cry: “This is what democracy looks like.”

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(Photos: Morgan Baskin)

And with the future uncertain for religious, reproductive, LGBTQ, health care, immigration, and other rights, allies of all ages and ethnicities marched in solidarity. Babies and toddlers sporting “THE FUTURE IS FEMALE” shirts were strapped onto their parents’ backs; elderly women and men claiming they’d marched in protest of the Vietnam war joined their Millennial counterparts in staggering numbers.

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(Photo: Morgan Baskin)

One of them, 91-year-old Sara Meric, says she joined the crowd because, in the words of John Donne: “‘No man is an island … never send to know for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for thee.’ That’s why I march.”

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