Since When Is It OK to Be Pregnant in Public? - Pacific Standard

Since When Is It OK to Be Pregnant in Public?

Author:
Publish date:

As recently as the 1950s, pregnancy was supposed to be a private matter, hidden behind closed doors.

By Lisa Wade

dc767-1n9c5pbjqa8frrwwzq8lyng

A pregnant woman at the office on July 18, 2005, in London, England. (Photo: Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Pregnancy wasn’t always something women did in public. In her new book, Pregnant With the Stars: Watching and Wanting the Celebrity Baby Bump, Renée Ann Cramer puts public pregnancies under the sociological microscope, but she notes that it is only recently that being publicly pregnant became socially acceptable. Even as recently as the 1950s, pregnancy was supposed to be a private matter, hidden behind closed doors. That big round belly was, she argues, “an indicator that sex had taken place, [which] was simply considered too risqué for polite company.”

Lucille Ball was the first person on television to acknowledge a pregnancy, real or fictional. It was 1952, but it was considered lewd to actually say the word “pregnant,” so the episode used euphemisms like “blessed event” or simply referred to having a baby or becoming a father.

Almost 20 years later, in 1970, a junior high school teacher was forced out of the classroom in her third trimester on the argument that her visible pregnancy would, as Cramer puts it, “alternately disgust, concern, fascinate, and embarrass her students.” So, when Demi Moore posed naked and pregnant on the cover of Vanity Fair just 21 years after that, it was a truly groundbreaking thing to do.

443af-1b3kxl5l3-xac9fyuw6tomg

Today, being pregnant in public is unremarkable. Visibly pregnant women are free to run errands, go to restaurants, attend events, even dress up their “baby bump” to try to (make it) look cute. All of this is part of the entrance of women into the public sphere more generally and the pressing of men to accept female bodies in those spaces. The next frontier may be breast feeding, an activity related to female-embodied parenting that many still want to relegate to behind closed doors. We may look back in 20 years and be as surprised by intolerance of breastfeeding as we are today over the idea that pregnant women weren’t supposed to leave the house. Time will tell.

52b1b-1olxo2suf2zbtxki9lg10uw

||

This story originally appeared on Sociological Images, a Pacific Standard partner site, as “When Did It Become Allowable to Be Pregnant in Public?”

Related