This Spring's Predicted Flood Risks: An Essential Reading List

A report from NOAA warns that two-thirds of the lower 48 states are expected to face increased precipitation and flood risk through May.
Author:
Publish date:
Updated on
A home sits in floodwater on March 20th, 2019, in Hamburg, Iowa.

A home sits in floodwater on March 20th, 2019, in Hamburg, Iowa.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued its Spring Outlook on Thursday, warning that two-thirds of the lower 48 states are expected to face increased precipitation and flood risk through May.

This report comes as some areas of the Midwest are already experiencing historic and catastrophic levels of flooding due to a combination of factors, including late season snowfall, heavy rain, rapid snowmelt, high soil moisture, and ice jams. In the upper Mississippi and Red River of the North basins, spring precipitation is already up to 200 percent higher than normal, NOAA says. In Nebraska, the state at the center of the floods, it will take years to rebuild lost infrastructure and restore the state's valuable soil, Earther reports. Additional spring rain will prolong these conditions, NOAA says, making flooding threats worse and more widespread.

"This outlook will help emergency managers and community decision-makers all along the nation's major waterways prepare people and businesses for the flood threat," Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., NOAA's acting administrator, said in the report. "In addition to the safety aspects, our rivers are critical to the economic vitality of the nation, supporting commerce, recreation and transportation. NOAA forecasts and outlooks help people navigate extreme seasonal weather and water events to keep the country safe and moving forward."

Pacific Standard has reported on several cases of extreme weather this winter and spring addressed in NOAA's Spring Outlook:

Related