Issue #65: June/July 2018

Features

gene-drive

A Brief History of Gene Editing

In just over 40 years, we've gone from simple modifications to the development of a gene drive that could eradicate an entire species.

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Deleting a Species

We are on the brink of being able to genetically engineer an extinction. Should we?

A Sudanese camel trader in the Rub' al-Khali desert in the United Arab Emirates, where the animals sell for thousands of dollars and camel beauty pageants are a regular occurrence.

Tracks in the Sand

Around the world, camels are disappearing, along with the cultures and traditions of the people who have kept them.

Monarch's bones, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California–Berkeley.

Awakening the Grizzly

Inside the effort to reintroduce grizzlies to California.

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The Endling: Watching a Species Vanish in Real Time

On the frontlines of extinction in the Gulf of California, where the vaquita faces its final days.

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How Canadian Cops Ended a Decade-Long Fight Over How to Manage the World's Polar Bears

Over the last 10 years, the poaching and trafficking of animal products has become the fourth-highest-grossing crime in the world. But because wildlife crime is not bound by national borders and each country has its own rules and ideas, its management and policing has become unwieldy at best.

Culture Pages

Harlots.

PS Picks: Hulu's 'Harlots,' a Show That Foregrounds the Concerns of Women Above All Else

PS Picks is a selection of the best things that the magazine's staff and contributors are reading, watching, or otherwise paying attention to in the worlds of art, politics, and culture.

Friedrich Schiller (1759–1805), German poet, philosopher, historian, and playwright.

PS Picks: German Playwright Friedrich Schiller's 'Love and Intrigue'

PS Picks is a selection of the best things that the magazine's staff and contributors are reading, watching, or otherwise paying attention to in the worlds of art, politics, and culture.

Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America.

Why Our Families Can't Afford America

A portrait of the stressed and shrinking American middle class.

Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else).

The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else)

Ken Auletta's latest book explores the chaotic world of contemporary advertising.

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Objects That Matter: Taxidermy

Arsenic was long a preservative in the taxidermic process, despite criticism of the method as unnecessarily dangerous. But at least one contemporary scholar has suggested that metabolized arsenic extended the lives of late 19th-century taxidermists by decades.

Detail from the cover of Sick by Porochista Khakpour.

PS Picks: Porochista Khakpour's Unflinchingly Honest New Memoir

PS Picks is a selection of the best things that the magazine's staff and contributors are reading, watching, or otherwise paying attention to in the worlds of art, politics, and culture.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism.

A Cure for White Fragility

A new book argues that we can't overcome racism unless white people are willing to be a little uncomfortable.

Nicole Perlman.

Marvel Screenwriter Nicole Perlman Shatters the Glass Ceiling for Women in Sci-Fi

We spoke to Nicole Perlman about what she recommends reading, watching, and listening to.

Under One Roof.

PS Picks: The New 'Under One Roof' Exhibit at New York's Tenement Museum

PS Picks is a selection of the best things that the magazine's staff and contributors are reading, watching, or otherwise paying attention to in the worlds of art, politics, and culture.

Caleb Byerly.

Instruments of Fate

Caleb Byerly works with indigenous communities to rediscover—and rebuild—their people's lost instruments.

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These Two Museums in Georgia Offer Sharply Different Accounts of Stalin's Legacy

The question of how one society could arrive at such diametrically opposed visions of its own history is one that vexes not just Georgia.

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Can Art Help People Feel the Devastation of Climate Change?

Miranda Massie hopes the Climate Museum in New York City can convince visitors to be better stewards of the climate—by appealing at once to their intellect and their emotions.

The Fix

Full Page HR

Could California Become a Zero-Extinction State?

California plant lovers are finding—and nurturing—species once presumed to be extinct in the wild.

Field Notes

Thousands of people gather to hear Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) during a campaign rally at the Prince William County Fairground on September 14th, 2015, in Virginia.

Letter From Morgantown, West Virginia: On the Ground at Bernie Sanders' Rally of the Sick

Even though a majority of West Virginians see government health care as fundamentally un-American, even evil, they know the Affordable Care Act is saving lives every day.

Ilhan Omar campaigns on November 8th, 2016, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Letter From Minneapolis, Minnesota: Investing in the Muslim Community With Microloans

The city prides itself on working with those who are "un-bankable," and on evaluating loans based on individual stories instead of automated credit scores.

Orania, South Africa: Niklas Kirsten, a former paratrooper in the South African Army, instructs Erik Du Pree on handgun self-defense in the fields outside an ultra-conservative, all-Afrikaner stronghold known as Orania.

Field Notes: Practicing Self-Defense Outside an Ultra-Conservative Stronghold

Orania, South Africa: Niklas Kirsten, a former paratrooper in the South African Army, instructs Erik Du Pree on handgun self-defense in the fields outside an ultra-conservative, all-Afrikaner stronghold known as Orania.

Rankin, Pennsylvania: Built in the 19th century as part of the Homestead Steel Works complex, the Carrie Furnaces produced up to 1,250 tons of iron per day at their peak in the 1950s and '60s.

Field Notes: The Rusting Remains of a Famous Labor Dispute Site

Rankin, Pennsylvania: Built in the 19th century as part of the Homestead Steel Works complex, the Carrie Furnaces produced up to 1,250 tons of iron per day at their peak in the 1950s and '60s.

Lake Urmia, Iran: Men harvest tomatoes in the countryside near Lake Urmia, a large salt lake that is rapidly drying out. Scientists believe resulting salt storms will ravage the region's agriculture.

Field Notes: Harvesting Tomatoes in Iran Before It's Too Late

Lake Urmia, Iran: Men harvest tomatoes in the countryside near Lake Urmia, a large salt lake that is rapidly drying out. Scientists believe resulting salt storms will ravage the region's agriculture.

Primer

Imp Illustration

There's a Name for That: The Imp of the Perverse

Experiencing unpleasant intrusive thoughts is a common, and unthreatening, phenomenon, but how we deal with it can be dangerous.

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Anatomy of a Fact: A Note on Uncertainty

Deciphering what counts as true in our post-truth era.